Temple residents say they weren't notified of city's water outage

Some homeowners in Temple said they weren't told about a water outage that proceeded to last 30 hours.

TEMPLE - Several neighborhoods on Temple's west side saw their water return Friday, after a 30-hour water service interruption. And, some residents claimed the city did not provide them any notice of the problem.

The Temple Public Works Department repaired a major water main leak, which sparked a Boil Water Notice. But, several concerned customers told Channel 6 the city never explained to them why the water was gone or how long the outage would last.

Some residents lost service completely without explanation, while others heard about the outage from local media outlets. Others, said they received an automated call Thursday for the Boil Water Notice, but did not hear about the water main break.

In a press release sent to media outlets, including ours, Thursday, the City of Temple said it was repairing an eight inch waterline break at the intersection of Adams Avenue and Morgan's Point Road. In the release, the city said residents should boil their water -- but never said folks would be without water entirely. Asked about the issue Friday, a city spokesperson said she thought the repair would be completed sooner.

"When we arrived on site, we didn't know what we were getting into," Nicole Torralva, with the Temple Public Works Department, said. "Initially we thought we would be finished within a few hours."

Some homeowners said they wanted a better answer for the lack of notification they received from the city about the outage.

"They require your credit card, phone number, and of course, your address," resident Steve Neuer said. "You'd think they would be available to get ahold of you through the phone system or at least email."

In response to those concerns, the city said it sent a text alert at 5:30 p.m. Thursday. But, water customers' cell phones might not be on file to receive those alerts. The best way to start getting those notifications, the city said, was through a service called Code Red -- which is provided by the Central Texas Council of Governments. You can set up an account and register for emergency alerts by clicking here.

 

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