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LIST: Baylor among colleges planning to open this fall and some still evaluating

The University of Texas, Texas Tech, Texas A&M and Baylor have all announced they are working on plans to reopen in the fall.

After the spring was hit with the coronavirus pandemic, derailing all college sports and campus activities, most students were forced to finish their semesters totally online.

While the virus virtually shut down schools and universities across the globe, some Texas colleges are already hard at work preparing to reopen their campuses come fall.

We'll keep an eye on our local and state universities and update this list as colleges continue to update their plans.

Abilene Christian University

On April 29, the university said it has formed three committees to review all possible scenarios for reopening classes in the fall, but stressed they are more focused on bringing students back to campus and reopening residence halls.

Click here for more information. 

Austin Community College

ACC has not yet announced plans for fall 2020.

Click here for more COVID-19 updates from the university.

Baylor University

On April 27, Baylor announced that it plans to resume in-person classes and residential life this fall. These plans are dependent on the decline of COVID-19 cases within the city of Waco, as well as guidance from federal, state and local health officials.

The university's full announcement can be read here.

Concordia University

On April 30, Concordia announced that it intends to return to normal operations for fall 2020, including face-to-face classes, residential living and on-campus activities. The university said despite their plan to return to normal, they are preparing for the possibility of not being able to do so.

The full announcement can be read here.

Rice University

Rice University President David Leebron said he is optimistic about reopening the school in the fall.

"For those whose students are not graduating, we know you are wondering what the fall will bring. As you can imagine, we are constantly assessing the situation. No one really knows how the pandemic will progress, and we are balancing the value of being able to plan on the basis of concrete decisions with the value of making the best decision when more information is available. Whatever our decisions, we will need to be flexible as the situation evolves. Based on the state of the disease spread in Houston and Texas, as well as the trajectory around the country, we are cautiously optimistic about opening our campus for students in the fall. We are working hard to make sure all the right measures are in place for that. We expect to have some preliminary communications regarding the fall by the end of next week. Over the summer, we will resolve how to best balance the imperative for safety while maintaining the great college experience your children have enjoyed and look forward to returning to."

Click here for more information.

Sam Houston State University

As of April 29, SHSU is beginning its return-to-campus operations.

Click here for more information.

Stephen F. Austin University

As of April 23, Stephen F. Austin is currently exploring its options for the fall semester.

"Currently, we are evaluating options for how we will operate in the fall, especially from a teaching and learning perspective. We understand that your lives have been altered and each of you have varying levels of concern and financial situations that may have changed during the COVID-19 crisis. As a result, we are currently working on a Lumberjack Flex Model that will appeal to the wide variety of students, their learning styles, price sensitivities, and geographic locations. This model also will be sensitive to the fact that a resurgence of COVID-19 could occur, and if so, we will be prepared to mitigate its impact on teaching and learning. We hope to have this Lumberjack Flex Model developed and vetted as early as possible this summer. We will share this model with you as soon as we can."

Click here for more information.

Southern Methodist University

SMU says it intends to be open in the fall.

"I am pleased to announce that SMU intends to safely open our University for on-campus teaching, learning and student living for the fall semester. We are looking forward to delivering the unique academic experience that defines SMU, and to rekindling the energy our students bring to campus," wrote President R. Gerald Turner.

Click here to read more.

Southwestern University (Georgetown)

Southwestern has not yet announced plans for fall 2020.

Click here for more COVID-19 updates from the university.

St. Edward's University

St. Edward's expects to release its fall plans by the end of June.

"Faculty and staff groups are working diligently to plan for the fall semester. We are actively addressing several scenarios for social distancing across campus including classes, residence halls, dining, student programs, and more. Please look for details as they become available before the end of June."

Click here for more information.

Tarleton University

The university has created a task force for reopening in the fall.

"A special 'Reopen Tarleton' task force will begin developing strategies to rev our campus back up. We are confident that the regular fall semester on-campus instruction environment will occur and hopeful that summer activities — Texan Orientation, Duck Camp, youth camps — will resume in mid-July. However, we will carefully monitor the science and data related to COVID-19 to ensure that the well-being of our university community remains top priority."

Click here for more information.

Texas A&M University

The Texas Tribune on April 30 reported that students and football both are expected to return to Texas A&M this fall.

The report states TAMU plans to reopen its 11 campuses this fall, according to System Chancellor John Sharp.

Click here for more information.

RELATED: Texas A&M Chancellor says 13-game football season could occur, even with an October start

Texas Christian University 

TCU has not yet announced plans for fall 2020.

Click here for more COVID-19 updates from the university.

Texas State University

Texas State University currently has plans to resume classes in-person for the Summer II semester (July 6 through Aug. 5) and fall 2020. These plans could change according to public health advice and conditions.

Click here for more COVID-19 updates from the university.

Texas Tech University

The Texas Tribune also included Texas Tech in that report. Both schools said they are working on precautions to keep students safe when they return.

"The Texas Tech University System and its four universities are actively monitoring the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (termed "COVID-19) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China," the university wrote on April 29.

For more information on the university's coronavirus updates, click here.

University of Houston

The university has not yet announced plans for fall 2020.

Click here for more COVID-19 updates from the university.

University of North Texas

On April 30, UNT announced that it plans to begin limited in-person teaching as early as Summer II and plans to resume campus learning and residential life by the fall.

Click here for more COVID-19 updates from the university.

University of Texas

On April 30, UT Chancellor James B. Milliken confirmed to the Texas Tribune the university will reopen in the fall, but a decision on social distancing guidelines will be announced at a later date. Courses and activities could be "held in person and others online as dictated by health and safety concerns."

The university plans to have its full decision ready by the end of June.

RELATED: University of Texas still planning on reopening in fall, UT president says

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