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Surveillance video captures early moments of George Floyd's encounter with police

The video raises questions about a police press release, which claimed Floyd "physically resisted officers."

MINNEAPOLIS — Surveillance video from a nearby business shows what happened before a now widely-shared video was taken, showing a Minneapolis police officer restraining George Floyd by placing a knee across his neck.

The video is from a camera on Dragon Wok, which is across 38th Street from Cup Foods. 

It shows two officers approach a blue vehicle. Floyd is sitting in the driver's seat of the vehicle. 

About two minutes after officers first approach, Floyd appears to get out of the vehicle.  A police press release says "after he got out, he physically resisted officers."

The vehicle largely shields what happens in the moments after Floyd is out of the vehicle, but at one point, the video appears to show some sort of brief struggle. 

KARE 11 sent several questions to MPD for clarification on what happened in the moments after Floyd left the vehicle. As of this writing, MPD has yet to respond, but when asked during a news conference Wednesday whether Floyd resisted arrest, Chief Medaria Arradondo said he couldn't comment, citing the ongoing investigation. 

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey was asked during an earlier press conference Wednesday whether he had seen any evidence that Floyd was resisting arrest. 

"I have not seen any evidence to show that, no," he said. 

The video goes on to show an officer walk Floyd, who is handcuffed, to the building, where he sits for several minutes. Then, two officers walk Floyd across 38th Street toward Cup Foods. 

The viral video showing an officer placing a knee on Floyd was later taken outside the Cup Foods store. It's not clear how much time elapsed between the two videos, or what happened during that period. 

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