Killeen police are cracking down on drivers not following the "Slow Down Move Over" law.

The law requires drivers to slow down or change lanes when approaching stopped emergency vehicles or tow trucks.

On Thursday, Killeen police staged a tow truck on the side of the highway. Officers waited to see who would and wouldn't slow down or change lanes for the stopped vehicle. Over a three-hour time span, nearly 150 people received violations, more than 100 of them were for improper passing alone and one speeder was clocked going over 100 miles per hour.

"Our main priority is to save lives. It's not just about a police officer or a tow truck driver it could be a citizen, it could be your family member who has a flat tire on the side of the road. A slight distraction can cause a crash," Ofelia Miramontez, Killeen Police Department spokesperson said.

Harker Heights resident Stephanie Bowles is a huge advocate for the 'Slow Down Move Over' law. Her husband Scott Bowles was a driver with Goode Towing and Recovery. He was hit and killed by a passing minivan while he was picking up a broken down car on the side of the highway last year.

"The person who hit him gets to enjoy holidays and special occasions with her children and grandchildren, but if we want to celebrate anything we have to go to the cemetery," Bowles said.

Stephanie was also a tow truck driver for more than a decade, but with a young son at home, that has since changed.

"He's still not over it. He fears for losing his mom just like he lost his dad," said Bowles.

Sam Carroll was close friends with Scott and co-worker. Carroll said it's hard going on without him but is hopeful more traffic enforcement will help prevent tragedies down the line.

"I was the wrecker driver that had to go out there to see some of the mess it was awful. It's important for everyone to slow down, move over and save a life," said Carroll.

Stephanie Bowles says police are still investigating her husband's death.

The fine for improper passing is 200 dollars.